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Thread: RIP FRANK ROBINSON

  1. #1
    Senior Member joey12508's Avatar
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    RIP FRANK ROBINSON

    Just seen on twitter RIP

  2. #2
    Senior Member Austin's Avatar
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    One of the most underrated baseball figures, both statistically and historically important, of all-time.
    Set builder, autograph hunter and fan of the Texas Rangers & '50s-'60s Yankees

  3. #3
    Senior Member Erich's Avatar
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    Sad face. One of my favs. RIP
    Sig Starts Here


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    Senior Member dano7's Avatar
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    Sad indeed! Great player!!!!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Pinbreaker's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear of his passing..

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Pinbreaker; 02-07-2019 at 04:04 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Austin's Avatar
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    Here's an ESPN obituary showing how incredible he was:

    ESPN -- Frank Robinson, the first African-American manager in Major League Baseball and the only player to win MVP in both leagues, has died at age 83, MLB said Thursday.

    An outfielder and first baseman, Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982 in his first year of eligibility.

    A fearsome hitter, Robinson ranks 10th on the career home run list with 586. He won the Triple Crown with the Orioles in 1966 and became the first black manager in MLB history in 1975 with the Cleveland Indians.

    He also served as MLB's executive vice president of baseball development, with his focus on increasing African-American participation in the sport. He later served as a senior adviser to commissioner Rob Manfred.

    Robinson won his first MVP in 1961 when he helped lead the Cincinnati Reds to their first pennant in 21 years. He hit .323 with 37 home runs and 124 RBIs and led the majors in slugging (.611), OPS (1.015) and intentional walks (23) for a 93-61 Reds club that lost in the World Series to the New York Yankees.

    After a 10-year stay with the Reds that included a 1956 Rookie of the Year award, the 1961 MVP and a Gold Glove, the 30-year-old Robinson was traded by Cincinnati to the Baltimore Orioles ahead of the 1966 season.

    Despite coming off a 33-homer, 113-RBI season in 1965, Robinson was called an "old 30" by Reds owner Bill DeWitt and shipped to Baltimore. In return, Cincinnati received pitcher Milt Pappas and two other players -- none of whom came close to the stature of Robinson.

    In his first season in Baltimore, Robinson showed he still had plenty left in his 30-year-old body as he was named the AL MVP following a 1966 campaign in which he won baseball's Triple Crown. His MLB-best marks of 49 home runs, 122 RBIs, .316 batting average and 122 runs scored helped carry the Orioles to their first World Series title.

    Robinson played five more seasons in Baltimore and finished in the top three of MVP voting twice more before he split time from 1972 to 1974 with the Dodgers, Angels and Indians. After concluding the 1974 season as a member of the Indians, Robinson made history in 1975 as the first African-American to be named manager of a major league club, while he was still playing.

    Though paid only an additional $20,000 to handle both jobs, Robinson took the position knowing his place in history.

    "They said this was the chance for you to break that barrier," Robinson told Outside the Lines in 2016. "Open the door and to let more African-Americans to have the opportunity to come through it."

    However, Robinson was also aware of the challenges he would face as the league's first African-American manager.

    "I knew there was going to be an awful lot of pressure, a lot of expectation and a lot of unhappy people because when things went right, fine, but when things went wrong, it was going to be doubly bad because of me being the first black manager," Robinson said.

    Robinson retired from playing after the 1976 season, but his managerial career was just beginning.

    He remained the Indians' manager for the 1977 season and was honored by the franchise in 2017 with a statue outside of Progressive Field. He also served as manager for three other clubs: the Giants (1981-84), Orioles (1988-91) and Expos/Nationals (2002-2006). Robinson was named the AL Manager of the Year in 1989 with the Orioles and later led the Expos/Nationals franchise through its move from Montreal to Washington. Robinson was 1,065-1,176 over his 16 years as a manager but never made the playoffs.

    While Robinson, who grew up in Beaumont, Texas, dealt with racism and segregation during his career and broke barriers as an African-American manager, he said his accomplishments pale in comparison to those of Jackie Robinson. Though the two men were unrelated, they were often mentioned together.

    Being the sport's first black manager "was nothing compared to what Jackie did or what he went through, but it was important because I was the first and that meant the door's open," Robinson told OTL in 2016. "But how long the door would stay open depended on basically the way I conducted myself and the success that I would have."
    Set builder, autograph hunter and fan of the Texas Rangers & '50s-'60s Yankees

  7. #7
    Super Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austin View Post
    One of the most underrated baseball figures, both statistically and historically important, of all-time.
    Completely agree.

    I'd even say he was THE most under-rated player, certainly of his time and probably ever...
    Don't forget to use the FCB Link when buying on eBay!

  8. #8
    Senior Member AnthonyCorona's Avatar
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    Damn one of the greats. RIP


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Please note: Card collecting is my hobby, not my life. I don't take it that serious and like to keep it fun.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Enfuego79's Avatar
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    One of the Pioneers of Baseball #SIP


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    "Are you crying? Are you crying? There's no crying in Baseball!!" - Tom Hanks.

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    "Are you crying? Are you crying? There's no crying in Baseball!!"
    There is today. RIP Frank.

  11. #11
    Member BigAppleJak's Avatar
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    What a class act...
    Not just baseball's loss.
    RIP

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