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Thread: New Baseball Card movie on YouTube

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    Senior Member BBCgalaxee's Avatar
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    New Baseball Card movie on YouTube

    Jack of all trades
    Has anyone seen it yet?




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    Senior Member Austin's Avatar
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    I watched the trailer but haven't decided if I want to pay Youtube $4 for the movie.
    It looks like it's as much of a family drama as it is a baseball card documentary.
    Set builder, autograph hunter and fan of the Texas Rangers & '50s-'60s Yankees

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    Yup! I know the guy - he just announced it is getting picked up on Netflix. It is a good flick
    Tanner Jones, Author of Confessions of a Baseball Card Addict - Now Available on Amazon!
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    Senior Member Philip J. Fry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouschi View Post
    Yup! I know the guy - he just announced it is getting picked up on Netflix. It is a good flick
    Good, I already have Netflix

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    Junior Member EtherealSOC's Avatar
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    I bought it on iTunes. I applaud the effort, but ultimately it's trying to do two things at once and fails to do either of them really well. Stu Stone appears well-intentioned, but this film dwells so long on the "I thought I'd be rich on junk wax" messaging that it glosses over the fact that many people did get rich during the baseball card boom and the hobby is still alive and thriving in many environments. Stu reminisces about 1986 Donruss and how he busted 1000 packs and failed to pull a single Canseco rookie, but then reminds the audience over and over again that it isn't worth anything anyway. My response? What do you mean it's not worth anything? By your own admission baseball cards bring you back to the best times of your life, to the childhood and the family with whom you desperately wish to reconnect, and a booming family business. Stu spends the entire movie only recognizing value in terms of dollars and cents, and he misses the very point he was trying to make. A tender moment when he clearly uses baseball cards as catharsis and re-connection is relegated to a brief clip during the end credits, and the climax briefly shows how the hobby brought people together - and still brings people together - before Stu destroys this point for the sake on an end scene with a sense of finality.

    A movie about baseball cards and broken families could not be tailored closer to me unless I wrote and starred in it myself, and I'm glad I bought it on iTunes and supported a Canadian documentary film-maker and former baseball card enthusiast. That said, it was such a missed opportunity, since the hobby is the one thread running through so many of the closest relationships in Stu's life - his mother, his sister, and his best friends (who largely make up the film-making team) - but all he sees are his broken dreams of getting rich from the stacks of unopened boxes in his mother's condo. I feel bad for Stu in one sense, since I feel like he ignored how much he has to be grateful for, but I have no sympathy for collectors who stashed cases of junk wax, changing the hobby from a youth-driven novelty to investment-style business, only to find their hoards are barely worth the cardboard they are printed on. When you make it a business you accept the risk that comes with it. If the hobby was responsible for enriching the most important relationships in your life you'd think you could look beyond monetary value and I suspect Stu does have an appreciation for baseball cards that goes deeper than that, it just wasn't captured very well in his story. Jack of All Trades will seem like a must-see for any baseball card collector, but after you watch it you'll feel like you've been shorted a hit.
    Last edited by EtherealSOC; 06-17-2019 at 08:08 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Austin View Post
    I watched the trailer but haven't decided if I want to pay Youtube $4 for the movie.
    It looks like it's as much of a family drama as it is a baseball card documentary.
    you have to pay? really? I never knew they did that
    I collect Ken Griffey Jr, Ryan Howard, Steve Carlton and the rest of the Phillies.
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    Member Letch77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EtherealSOC View Post
    I bought it on iTunes. I applaud the effort, but ultimately it's trying to do two things at once and fails to do either of them really well. Stu Stone appears well-intentioned, but this film dwells so long on the "I thought I'd be rich on junk wax" messaging that it glosses over the fact that many people did get rich during the baseball card boom and the hobby is still alive and thriving in many environments. Stu reminisces about 1986 Donruss and how he busted 1000 packs and failed to pull a single Canseco rookie, but then reminds the audience over and over again that it isn't worth anything anyway. My response? What do you mean it's not worth anything? By your own admission baseball cards bring you back to the best times of your life, to the childhood and the family with whom you desperately wish to reconnect, and a booming family business. Stu spends the entire movie only recognizing value in terms of dollars and cents, and he misses the very point he was trying to make. A tender moment when he clearly uses baseball cards as catharsis and re-connection is relegated to a brief clip during the end credits, and the climax briefly shows how the hobby brought people together - and still brings people together - before Stu destroys this point for the sake on an end scene with a sense of finality.

    A movie about baseball cards and broken families could not be tailored closer to me unless I wrote and starred in it myself, and I'm glad I bought it on iTunes and supported a Canadian documentary film-maker and former baseball card enthusiast. That said, it was such a missed opportunity, since the hobby is the one thread running through so many of the closest relationships in Stu's life - his mother, his sister, and his best friends (who largely make up the film-making team) - but all he sees are his broken dreams of getting rich from the stacks of unopened boxes in his mother's condo. I feel bad for Stu in one sense, since I feel like he ignored how much he has to be grateful for, but I have no sympathy for collectors who stashed cases of junk wax, changing the hobby from a youth-driven novelty to investment-style business, only to find their hoards are barely worth the cardboard they are printed on. When you make it a business you accept the risk that comes with it. If the hobby was responsible for enriching the most important relationships in your life you'd think you could look beyond monetary value and I suspect Stu does have an appreciation for baseball cards that goes deeper than that, it just wasn't captured very well in his story. Jack of All Trades will seem like a must-see for any baseball card collector, but after you watch it you'll feel like you've been shorted a hit.
    Excellent write-up and review!
    Wanting to buy '96 Select Certified Mirror Gold baseball...commons & stars

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    Quote Originally Posted by bongo870 View Post
    you have to pay? really? I never knew they did that
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    Senior Member AnthonyCorona's Avatar
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    Does the main character trim cards and sell them through PWCC?


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    Please note: Card collecting is my hobby, not my life. I don't take it that serious and like to keep it fun.

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    Senior Member Austin's Avatar
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    It'll be on Netflix beginning July 16th in the US and November in Canada.
    Set builder, autograph hunter and fan of the Texas Rangers & '50s-'60s Yankees

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