Welcome to our community

Be apart of something great, join today!

MrMopar's New Dodgers Autograph Thread

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Franklin Stubbs. I do really like this card. 86 doesn't get the credit it deserves, buried among a decade worth of some of the worst Topps designs ever! This image could be right at home in the 1973 Topps set. The only actual Dodgers auto of the day.Stubbs.jpg

Andy Kosco 67T. AK.jpg

Juan Marichal. I didn't even have the regular 72 Topps Marichal, so when a signed copy caught my attention, why not? Would love to have a complete Topps run signed by Juan, but doubt that will happen anytime soon. I really just wish he had a regular Topps card with the Dodgers for that career capping 2 game stint in 75 though. JM.jpg

Dick Nen 68T. DN.jpg

Lastly, I am really excited for this lot and missed out on another that just ended recently, as it went almost another $50 higher than my max bid. I do love these Mariner team issue postcards. You see them signed and unsigned. I will pick up either type. There were a few former/future Dodgers that played for the M's, but the only one in my 2 lots was Jack Perconte, who was included in both. My Mariner auto collection got a nice boost, but not so much for the Dodgers collection.

Perconte 2.jpgPerconte.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Only 1 today (last 2 days actually), but a pretty good one.

Duke Snider. From the Brooklyn Master collection. I would have really liked to get one of these sets. Special edition, wood box presentation, loaded with nothing but Dodgers (base set + GU/AU cards and a mystery bonus pack that contained something extra good), but a price near $1K was just too steep for me at the time. I'll just pick up a few here and there and be satisfied. Snider.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
This was too good to pass up. I have several of these, but it listed at $20 BIN. It is a limited edition pin set that includes 10 enamel pins and a plaque, signed and numbered to 1000 copies. Steve Garvey. The company that made these, Imprinted Products, issued a variety of Garvey items with a similar look to the image on the plaque, including pens, pencils, buttons, towels, shirts, mugs, etc. I have a variety of that stuff already in my collection. You don't see it pop up too often anymore though. s-l1600.jpg

Greg Brock Police card. Brock.jpg

Luis Cruz /25. Cruz played mostly SS/3B parts of 2012-13. It seems he only has a couple Dodger cards. I find only 2 on ebay at the moment, 2013 Topps and Heritage. I would like to have his Topps card signed. Several Heritage cards signed for sale, but seems everyone wants around $15. Too much. I got this certified card /25 for $1. I prefer Dodgers, but let's be real here! s-l500.jpgLC.jpg

Davey Johnson on a minor league card. Johnson never played for them, but managed the team in 1999 and 2000. This was in the middle of a stretch that they were winning more than losing most of the time, but were not making the playoffs. He is sandwiched between Bill Russell and Jim Tracy as manager. DJ.jpg

The last item was a surprise and since it was not advertised, I don't have a scan other than the one the seller used for the auction, the 5 magazines. I still need to figure out the new scanner and just start scanning my own images. Seems like a perfect time to do it with covid home sheltering, but have been focusing most of my free time on sorting cards and recording records on to CD. The scanning part may come later...

Anyway, bought a lot of (5) 90s Dodgers Magazine. I recently got into these. I think they were basically the scorecards in that era. They are bigger, like magazines, with more content than the older scorecards typically had. The Dodgers sold these from around the late 90s to not sure exactly when, maybe late 90s? I try to find larger lots with reasonable shipping when I buy them so I can get them for cheap. This lot was $5 plus $5 s/h, so around $2 per issue.

To my surprise, inside the first issue I looked at was what appeared to a player or event provided Maury Wills postcard and one of those 5x7 blank autograph sheets they hand out at signings when someone has nothing else to have signed, with the name of the event printed on it. Both were signed by Wills. Score!! That was not it though. In the part of the magazine where these items were tucked was a full page color photo of Wills, also signed. 3 Bonus Maury Wills autographs for a lot I already felt was a good deal w/o signatures. Who doesn't love finding bonus autographs?

s-l1600-1.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Steve Garvey. This one is /5. Still logo-less though, so not as good in my book. Garvey 5.jpg

Jesse Chavez (x2). Yet another in a long line of short timer Dodgers pitchers. Chavez (Who?) joined the Dodgers Aug 1, 2016 from the Blue Jays in trade for Mike Bolsinger (Who?). It was his 7th team since making the bigs in 2008. He finished the year with the team, going 1-0 in 23 appearances. He was granted free agency in early November and was signed by the Angels in mid November. Since then, he has also played for the Rangers, Cubs and Rangers again! He gets around. JC1.jpgJC 2.jpg

Luis Cruz. This OPC set is just plain cool. Great action shots, nice design and colors, some cool horizontal cards, GU, Autos. It had it all, including buybacks I am told. I was not buying wax then, otherwise I might have tried to get several boxes. Looks like it would have been a fun rip.LC .jpg

Wrapping it up with 5 Casey Sadler cards. I could not help myself at $2-2.50 each. I got 3 from one person and 2 from another, hence the duplicate. When this guy first came to the Dodgers, there was nothing out there for sale. No cards, no autos, nothing. I finally snagged a minor league card for the Dodgers collection and before I knew it, he was already gone. Probably does not even have a Dodger card to get signed. On July 3, 2019, the Dodgers traded a minor leaguer for Sadler. He seemed to be effective, going 4-0, with 20 Ks and a 2.33 ERA in 24 games (27 IP). He even got a save. Yet, the Dodgers, stacked with pitchers apparently, traded him to the Cubs in January of this year. I do like modern minor league cards better than their vintage counterparts though.

CS1.jpgCS2.jpgCS 1.jpgCS 2.jpgCS 3.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Nearly a week long drought, which is always more than likely a good thing. I still feel like I buy too much, although I am a bit of a bargain hunter cheapo. I did have a little more spare time and only a handful of players arrived today, so did some digging to keep it interesting.

Ed Roebuck 58 Topps. He broke into the bigs in 1955, the year the Dodgers won the world series for the first time in franchise history, and after a very tough streak of 5 WS losses, all since 1941 and all to the hated Yankees! The Yanks would finally lose, but turn around the following year and beat the Dodgers again! What a time that must have been to be living in NY. Roebuck was a decent reliever and the rookie lead the 55 club with 12 saves and a record of 5-6. He got a taste of the WS, appearing in 1 game (2 innings) with no decision. In the 56.WS, he would appear in 3 games, but only 4 1/3 innings and also no decision. He lasted 8 seasons with Brooklyn/LA before heading to Washington in 1963 in a straight up trade for Marv Breeding. Breeding hit .167 for the Dodgers the remainder of the season, was purchased by the Orioles and never cracked the majors again, finally hanging it up in 1968 after being kicked around between 5 clubs in 5 years. Roebuck played 2 years in DC before heading to Philly to end his career in 1966. He was 52-31 career with a 3.35 era and 62 saves. He died in 2018. Roebuck.jpg

Elmer Valo 58 Topps. Valo was born in Czechoslovakia in 1921. He would go on to play MLB for 20 years, the stop in Bro/LA being near the end of a career that began in 1940. A veteran of WWII, like many others, he lost 2 seasons of his prime playing days to the war. An excellent contact hitting outfielder for the Athletics for most of the 40s and early 50s, Valo ended up playing for 9 different teams (if you include franchise moves, as he moved with the A's, Dodgers and Senators/Twins). He played a year in Brooklyn and a year in LA (57-58), both half seasons or less. By this time he was winding down his career, but he was there long enough to get a Dodgers card, for which I am grateful. Valo died in 1998. Valo.jpg

John Candelaria. 81 Donruss. Candy Man was a big lefty (6'7") who managed to string along a 19 year MLB career, mostly as a starting pitcher. His stop in LA was near the end, spending 91-92 with the Dodgers exclusively as a reliever by that time. He was a combined 3-7 with 7 saves for the club in those 2 seasons. After that, he spent a year back in Pittsburgh, where his career began, before calling it quits. JC.jpg

Rip Repulski. 1958 Topps. "Rip" was a 1x AS, mostly for the Cardinals in the 50s. He and former Dodger Bobby Morgan were traded to the Phillies in 1956 and it would be this move from Philly that might be his most interesting trivia factoid. After 2 years, the Phillies packaged Repulski up with young pitchers Jim Golden and Gene Snyder and traded those three for a young 2B prospect in the Dodgers minor league system. The 24 year old prospect had been with Brooklyn since 1953, unable to break the line up with the likes of Jackie Robinson and Jim Gilliam covering second for the parent club. His name, George "Sparky" Anderson! Anderson never appeared for the Dodgers at the MLB level (too bad), but would finally make the majors for a single season in 1959 as the starting 2B for The Phillies. The trade and his rookie season were enough to earn him 2 cards as a player, 1959 & 1960 Topps. The next year he found himself playing in AAA for the Toronto Maple Leafs. He continued playing for the team through 1963 and would then start a new career in 1964, at the age of 30, by taking over as Manager for the Maple Leafs. That move to the managerial ranks would eventually lead him into the baseball Hall of Fame!

So back to Rip. Rip was at the end of his journey, when he spent parts of 2 seasons with the Dodgers (53 games in 1959 and just 4 games in 1960 before being traded to the Red Sox for Nelson Chittum.). On another brief tangent, Chittum is yet another trade piece that never made the big club in LA. He spent 3 years in the LA minor league system before closing his career out as a Baltimore farm hand in 1964. The 6 games he played in Boston before the trade with Repuski were his last at the MLB level. The 31 year old Rip was less than spectacular for Boston in 1960 in 73 games and managed 15 more in 1961 before being released, ending his career at 32. Repulski did have 2 Dodgers cards for his time though, 1959 & 1960 Topps. He died in 1993. RR.jpg
 

dano7

Well-known member
Aug 7, 2008
9,907
Roanoke, VA
Great! Especially like the 58’s, but also got to see Candelaria pitch in Salem, when he was in the Pirates system
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Today's batch is less pleasing to the eye. No photos were involved! The Garvey is signed on the back of his 1983 Padres Postcard, but the others are 3x5s.

Garvey. I bought this for 2 reasons. 1) This particular PC is seen less than just about any other Garvey PC. I am beginning to suspect that this was not issued to the public, but possibly made by or given to him (and maybe other players have cards as well) for fan mail. I believe this may be true because I do not recall ever seeing one that was NOT signed and many found are postmarked, like Garvey or someone for him was sending them through the mail as an actual paid postcard that he signed. 2). This one proves the issue date of the PC. Garvey was only with the Padres for a total of 5 seasons, 83-87, so pinpointing something in that range isn't too tough. However, these team issue items can be tricky if you have no other reference. The postmark on this one is Sept, 1983, thus proving beyond doubt this particular PC issue was from 1983. Garvey was signed by the Padres in late December 1982 and probably didn't don a full Padres uniform until spring training in 1983. The postcards were obviously made somewhere in between that time frame. Garvey.jpg

Joe Black. His career was quite short, 6 years, but he came out with a bang for the 1952 Dodgers, winning NL ROY as a reliever. He was 15-4 with a 2.15 ERA and 15 saves in 142 innings of work. The Dodgers apparently got both he and Jim Gilliam in 1951 from the Baltimore Negro League club for $11K cash. Gilliam would follow Black's performance by winning the NL ROY himself the following year (1953). $11K well spent by the Dodgers! Given the circumstances, that sounds horrible these days, except you have to remember that some baseball transactions were players for cash, even today. Sadly, Joe would not see a parallel success again. Winning only 7 games and saving 5 over the next 3 years including spending most of 1954 in the minors (45 games) with the Dodgers, he was finally dealt to the Reds in 1955 (just in time to miss their triumphant WS win), again for cash and a player to be named later, one Bob Borkowski who managed to bat .105 in 9 games for the club. Bob's career would linger 2 more years in the minors, but those 9 games were it for him at the MLB level. As for Black, 3 mediocre years with the Reds (9-5, 5 saves) and he ended his career with the Senators in 1957, going 0-1 in 7 games. Black.jpg

Finally, a pair of Jim Brewer 3x5s. Brewer was a pretty good reliever for the Dodgers throughout the mid 60s to mid 70s. Even now, he is still the #5 career save leader for the club, trailing #3 Jeff Shaw by only 3 and #4 Todd Worrell by a single save. Gagne is #2 with 161 and Kenley Jansen has blown everyone else away with 301 to date.

Brewer came up with the Cubs in 1960. In a trade that was less memorable, but perhaps just as bad as the Lou Brock trade to St. Louis a year later, the Cubs sent Brewer and Cuno Barragan to the Dodgers in December 1963 for pitcher Dick Scott. Barragan was a 31 year old catcher who had played just 1 game for the Cubs at the MLB level in 1963. It would be his last. He never played for the Dodgers at any level and appears to have been out of baseball that year. Dick Scott was a rookie in 1963, having registered 2 saves with a 0-0 record in 9 games for the Dodgers. The Cubs got 3 games out of him in 1964 with the same 0-0 record with no saves. And like Barragan the season before for the Dodgers, Scott was out of baseball following the 1964 season.

Brewer on the other hand would not quite measure up to fellow former Cub Brock, but he had a very respectable 17 year career, finishing 69-65 with a 3.07 ERA and 133 saves. Aside from his last 2 years in baseball with the Angels (1975-76), he spent the remainder of his time with the Dodgers after joining the team in 1964. He was a 1x AS selection for the Dodgers, late in his career (1973). He also made very brief appearances in each of the 1965, 1966 & 1974 World Series, 1 game each year with no decisions or saves.

Sadly, Brewer lost his life due to injuries sustained in a head on vehicle accident on a wet Texas highway in 1987. This was just 2 days after his 50th birthday. He had recently rejoined the Dodgers club as a rookie league pitching coach, after several years working at the collegiate level. brewer 1.jpgBrewer 2.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
I gotta add that I don't know if any of you are enjoying them, but I am enjoying researching and writing these little blurbs about the players. I often know the basics about many of these guys, but am finding out neat little tidbits. For example, Brewer won a lawsuit against Billy Martin, after Martin charged the mound and punched Brewer in the face in a 1960 game. This caused some vision issues for Brewer and he ended up suing Martin for $1Million. Eventually, years later, it was settled for around $10K. Coincidentally, Martin himself died in an automobile accident just 2 years after Brewer.
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
One today, Shawn Green Silver Archives /199. Green gave the Dodgers 5 solid years in the meat of his career, from 2000-2004. During that time he made 1 of 2 career AS game appearances, had 2 seasons of 40+ HR & 100+ RBI and hit 4 HRs in a game. In that 4 HR game, he also had 2 additional hits and went 6 for 6 with 6 runs, 7 RBIs & 19 total bases, setting a major league record. Several other records came from that game & stretch of time centering around the 4 HR game as well. His 200th HR came in that historic game and he ended his career with 328, although not quite HOF material when he was dropped from the ballot in his first year of eligibility after gathering only 2 votes.

The Dodgers got him and Jorge Nunez from the Toronto Blue Jays for Pedro Borbon and Raul Mondesi. It seemed to look like a good trade for both clubs, as both key players had been emerging young stars prior to the trade. The toss-in Nunez never made the majors and Borbon (son of former 1970s Reds pitcher of the same name), who was only in LA for a single season, only lasted 4 more years and bounced around 2 more teams before his last year at the MLB level, in 2093. In fact, the Dodgers signed him again in the winter of that year, but released him by March before the Cardinals picked him up for the season where he was 0-1 in 7 games.

Mondesi was 28 and Green 26 at the time of the trade, but Mondesi kind of fell apart a few seasons after the trade and was out of baseball by the end of 2005. He gave Toronto 2.5 decent seasons before they traded him to the Yankees. He lingered for another 3.5 years, playing for 5 different clubs before being released by the Braves. By 2010, he had become the Mayor of San Cristobal, in the Dominican Republic and served until 2016. Apparently though, he committed fraud and embezzled $6M in public funds and was sentenced to 8 years prison in 2017. Mondesi has 2 sons that played organized ball as well, Raul Jr who never made the majors in the Milwaukee organization and Raul Aldelberto, who is currently on the Royals with 4 years MLB experience under his belt.

Green.jpg
 

Letch77

Well-known member
Jan 28, 2018
1,127
Midwest
Adalberto has huge potential...he's starting to break out. I like that he made his MLB debut in the World Series; not many players can or will be able to say that!
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Bobby Castillo P/C sized BW photo. Castillo was a reliever with the Dodgers from 1977-81 with a return career capper in 1985. He got to pitch 1 inning in the 1981 WS. He died in 2014 at ther age of 59 from cancer. Castillo.jpg

Bill Grabarkewitz 70T. Billy G was the Dodgers starting 3B in 1970. Essentially his rookie season, although he appeared in 34 games in 1969, he had a breakout year. It was looking like another young prospect sitting behind him might have to wait a while to play. Billy was an AS that year, with 157 H, 17HR, 84 RBI and hit .289. However, that would be the icing on his short career. By 1973, he was off to the Angels as part of a blockbuster deal. For Grabarkewitz, along with future HOFer Frank Robinson, Bill Singer, Mike Strahler and Bobby Valentine, the Angels sent Ken McMullen and Andy Messersmith. The prospect behind Billy in 70 was none other than Steve Garvey, who would eventually take over the starting 3B spot before moving across the IF to 1B for good by 1974. Grab.jpg

Camilo Pascual 70T. Pascual played from 1954-1971 and was a decent pitcher for the Senators/Twins in the early 60s for a stretch. 7x AS (was on both rosters for the dual ASG years) and had 2x 20W seasons. Near the end of his career (1970), the Dodgers signed him in the spring and he appeared in 10 games (14 inning) with a 2.57 ERA, earning no decision before being released in late August. CP.jpg

Wayne Terwilliger 53T. Terwilliger's MLB career spanned from 1949-1960, although he only actually played at that level 9 years in that span. his time with the Dodgers was short, coming to the team from the Cubs in a 8 man deal that sent Bruce Edwards, Joe Hatten, Gene Hermanski and Eddie Miksis to the Cubs for Andy Pafko, Johnny Schmitz, Terwillier and Rube Walker. This trade, although having nothing to do with it specifically, allowed for the 1952 Topps cards set to feature #1 as new Brooklyn Dodger Andy Pafko. This card in just about any condition commands a premium today, but should only be true for the nicest of the batch. Terwilliger logged in 37 games with the bums, hitting .280. The Senators would select him off waivers the following season and he was gone as fast as he arrived. WT.jpg

Bill Buckner, cover of newspaper insert section. Bucker was actually a Dodger from 1969-76. Most people probably are unaware or just think of him as a Cub or Red Sox, which is where most of his fame resided. He was a good hitter and won a batting title in 1980 with a .324 average. He was frequently a .300+ hitter in his prime, although he was only an AS in 1981! The guy didn't even get the call the year he won a batting crown. No respect! Sadly, he will probably be most well known for his part of the Red Sox WS loss to the Mets in 1986. Sad legacy for such a good ball player. BB.jpg

Cal Abrams 3x5. I don't have much to say, other than Abrams has a pretty cool 51 Bowman card. He spent 3 years with the Dodgers before being shipped to the Reds for a minor leaguer and some cash in 1952. Abrams.jpg

Solly Drake 3x5. Drake played 9 games for the Dodgers in 1959. He does have a 59T Dodger card, but his autograph seems to be pretty tough. I found out several years back he was a Reverend in LA and still alive, but apparently is and has been a non-signer for a while. I tried to reach him through the church and got no reply. I didn't try very hard, but also didn't want to invade his privacy. He is 89 years old now and I would love it if someone could get him to sign some cards before he passes! He had a younger brother Sammy, who also played at the MLB level. Apparently they were the first black brother combo to play in MLB, at least in the "modern" times, with Moses Fleetwood Walker and his brother also playing in the 19th Century. Drake.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Davey Lopes 79 Hostess. Long time Dodger infielder, part of the longest running infield of Garvey, Lopes, Russell & Cey, who anchored the Dodgers infield from 1973-1981, finally broken up when the Dodgers sent Lopes to Oakland in 1982 for minor leaguer Lance Hudson. The Dodgers definitely got screwed on that one!. Although his best years were behind him by then, Lopes hung around another 6 years. After his career as a player ended, he did some coaching and eventually worked his way up and managed the Milwaukee Brewers for 3 years, 2000-2002. He reunited with the Dodgers as a coach in 2011 and stayed until 2015. Lopes.jpg

Wally Moon 78 Grand Slam. Moon started his career with the Cardinals and was the 1954 ROY. After 5 solid years with the team, they decided to trade him to the Dodgers. The 1958 trade sent Moon to LA along with Phil Paine for Gino Cimoli. This would be an excellent trade for the Dodgers, as Moon gave the team 7 years, including 2 AS appearances and a gold glove. He would play most of the 59 World Series and made 2 games in the 65 series. He did not play at all in the 63 WS for some reason. Moon just died in 2018 at 87. Moon GS.jpg

Johnny Podres 78 Grand Slam. Long time Dodger pitching star, 4x AS and MVP of the Dodgers first and only WS victory in Brooklyn. He won 2 games for the team in that battle against the hated Yankees. Ended his playing career with 2 years in Detroit (1966-67) and his last in San Diego (1969). He was a pitching coach for the Twins and Phillies later. I still remember Podres making his last "regular" appearance on a baseball card in the 1982 Donruss set, when they added a few coaches. He died in 2008. podres.jpg

Johnny Klippstein 79 Diamond Greats. Klippsten played 18 years in MLB, 2 of which with the Dodgers (1958-59). He was 7-5 with 11 saves across those two years and appeared in 1 WS game with no decision. The Dodgers drafted him in 1948, but the Cubs would land him in the 1949 rule 5 draft. He ended up on the Reds after Chicago and in 1958, they sent Klippstein, Steve Bilko & players to be named later to the Dodgers for Don Newcombe. Art Fowler and Charlie Rabb were the players named later. Newcombe was the one player in this group with the greatest longevity with his new team ( 3 years), as most of the players involved were gone within a year. Klippstein died in 2003. JK.jpg

Pete Mikkelsen 65T. Mikkelsen played out his career with the Dodgers, coming over from St. Louis in 1969. He was 24-17 with 20 saves. The Dodgers got the best of St. Louis in this deal, having to only give up a prospect named Jim Ellis, who pitched 5.1 innings that year before calling it a career. Due to some sort of contractual dispute with Topps, Mikkelsen does not have any cards issued of himself from 1969 through the end of his career, depriving Dodger fans like myself from having a Dodgers card issued during his playing career. He became a farmer after baseball and died in 2006 in the tri-cities area of Washington State. PM.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Jim Bunning. I am both excited and a little disappointed for this one. Technically, this is a Dodger item, but it is simply a xerox copy of the Target card, and a poorly cut one at that. I will continue to look for an upgrade. If by chance some day (hint hint), someone produces a sticker pack released auto featuring Bunning as a Dodger, that would be incredible.

Bunning was at the end of what would eventually be a hotly debated HOF career when in August 1969, the Pirates traded him to the Dodgers for two minor leaguers. Neither of those Dodger prospects ever did anything worth mentioning. The 37 year old Bunning appeared in 9 games, compiling a 3-1 record in 56 innings. He even had a complete game. Nowdays, he'd practically lead the league with a single complete game. He had 151 career CGs. For perspective, the top 5 career CG leaders COMBINED don't have 151! That is Colon (38), Verlander (26), F. Hernandez & Kershaw (25) ea and Wainwright (22). I realize the game is way different now with regard to relievers, but it sure sounds impressive. As a career, he is tied with 4 others at position number 224-228.

The Dodgers would release him after the season and the Phillies would bring him back for 2 more seasons before he called it quits. Either he was just no longer effective or the Phillies just sucked, as he ended up with a combined record of 15-27!

Unfortunately, Bunning's stint was not long enough and apparently he was picked up with ample time to appear in the 1970 set as a Philly. There is a nice action photo of Bunning pitching for the Dodgers sitting on ebay, but the seller has held firm at around $65. It's just too much to pay for me, especially considering you can find certified cards for under $10 sometimes. Maybe a real Target card or another photo will surface, but for now I have my Bunning Dodger item.Bunning.jpg

Gene Snyder. Snyder was 1-1 for the 1959 Dodgers in 11 games. He had control issues his entire career and threw 7 wild pitches and 20 walks in those 11 games (26 2/3 innings). That was the pinnacle of a career that began in 1950 with Philadelphia(minors) and ended in 1962 with Los Angeles (minors). Snyder joined the Dodgers organization in 1959 (in a trade I described a few days back that involved Sparky Anderson) and oddly enough did end up having a 1959 Topps Dodgers card. His signature seems to be somewhat tough to find, so it's either the Topps or the Target. He has no other cards according to an old Beckett alphabetical checklist. Snyder died in 1996 at age 65 in his birth town of York, PA. Snyder.jpg

Camilo Pascual. I just featured him the other day on a 1970 Topps card. Other than a Target card, his is not likely going to have any Dodger items to represent those 10 games he played for LA in 1970. That is why I decided to grab this item. Apparently he had scouted for A's 1982-88 and then the Dodgers organization since 1989. He was active as recent as 2013, but I think he has finally retired officially. He specialized in the Venezuela market, which is where this item originates. It is interesting to note that his biggest signing was that of Jose Canseco. He is also credited with bringing Alex Cora, Omar Daal, Miguel Cairo and Franklin Gutierrez to the Dodgers. Pascual is a member of the Cuban HOF. Pascual.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
The Dodgers and Mariners shared a number of players, perhaps no more than any other team, but since I also like the early Mariners team from my youth, those particular players really stand out. These two additions highlight this dual team relationship and are both Mariner items.

John Hale 70s Mariners Team Issue (?) Fan Mail PC. I am fairly certain these postcards were made, by the team, for fan mail requests in the 70s-80s. At some point, perhaps they stopped providing items as autograph seeking had gotten immensely popular and things were changing fast? Not sure, but I know that they are found both signed and unsigned, but it seems more often signed.

Hale was an outfielder who came up in the Dodger system and although he was a decent hitter in the minors, that never translated to the bigs. The Dodgers at this time were stacked and between 1974-1981 appeared in 4 World Series and they had little room for a weak hitting outfielder. He did get a September call-up in 1974 and went 4-4, but was not part of the post season. Hale's busiest season was 1977, when he appeared in 79 games for the club, only hitting .241. Just before the season ended, the Blue Jays selected him off waivers, but sold him to the Mariners just 2 weeks later. Sadly for Hale, this meant that he would miss the 1977 World Series. This is also where I "met" Hale for the first hime, as he would appeared in airbrushed splendor as a Mariner on his 1978 Topps card.

He would not fair much better in Seattle. The team was only in their second season and was hardly stacked with talent, but the 24 year old Hale would not make the most of his career high playing time in 1978. He definitely did not impress and one year prior to Mario Mendoza bringing his "Mendoza Line" play to town, Hale was setting the stage in Seattle by hitting .171 in 107 games! Interestingly enough, Mendoza hit a scorching .218 that year, sandwiched between equally unimpressive yet consistent seasons of .198. In his final season at the MLB level (1979), Hale did manage to outhit Mendoza, but still only could muster a .222 in 54 games. The M's released him in August of 79, just after Seattle hosted the All Star Game in the Kingdome. He kicked around with the Reds, Expos and Orioles minor league systems before hanging it up in 1981.

s-l500.jpgs-l1600-1.jpg

Bob Stinson. Old 'Scrap Iron" was one of a large number of Dodger prospects in the late 60s/early 70s who would go on to see the MLB level. He actually shares a rookie card in 1970 with Ray Lamb and had appeared in only 4 games for the 1969 Dodgers hitting .375, but had a solid AAA season and I guess Topps figured he was due. A much more successful Thurman Munson appeared in his first card that year as well, also a Rookie Stars card that he shared with a teammate. Stinson would get into another 4 games for the 1970 Dodgers, this time hitless. After the 70 season, Stinson was part of a blockbuster trade that also sent Ted Sizemore, 1969 NL ROY, to the Cardinals for slugger Richie "Dick" Allen. Allen had a fine season for the Dodgers in 71, but was used to get Tommy John from the White Sox and then went on to a MVP year in Chicago in 1972!

Stinson, on the other hand, would kick around a few teams in the early 70s (Cardinals, Astros, Expos and Royals) as a back-up catcher until being drafted by Seattle in the 1976 expansion draft, providing some veteran skills to the young club. He was the clubs primary catcher in their first 2 seasons, before moving more into a dual/back role in 1979-80. When the Mariners released the 34 year old in August of 1980, his career was over. Keeping on the Topps theme, Stinson's last card is pretty bad-ass and one of the better game action images from a set loaded with boring poses and head shots. I remember loving it when I saw it. s-l640.jpgs-l1600.jpg

Thinking about the bulk of my recent pick-ups, it really shows that you have to be a dedicated team collector to want to pick up a lot of these guys who were mostly otherwise mere blips on the radar of MLB history. To most, this pair I feature today are stone cold commons that few would even look twice at. But to me, they serve a dual collecting interest AND especially the item they are featured on, creates a very desirable collectible for me.
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
Irv Noren Heritage Red /60. Now I just need to find that dual with Ethier from the same issue /25!

Noren joined the Dodgers via free agency on June 7, 1960, 3 days after the Cubs had released him. He was actually drafted by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1946 and played in their system until 1950 when he landed with the Senators and made his MLB debut. After 2 solid seasons, the Senators traded him to the Yankees in a deal that brought Jackie Jenson & Spec Shea to NY. In NY, Noren would have the opportunity to play in 3 World Series and made the 1954 AS squad, the only time in his career for that honor. He was still in NY in 1956, but did not appear in that series. From there, he bounced around a bit until finally landing back on the Dodgers for a career capper.

In 26 games, he hit an even .200 and was released by the Dodgers following that season. That would prove to be the end for the 35 year old who was used exclusively as a pinch hitter by the Dodgers that season.

After baseball, Noren eventually became a horse owner and settled in Del Mar California where he would race his horses. He would live to be 94, dying in Del Mar 2 weeks shy of his 95th birthday in 2019. Noren Red.jpg

PS - This is why I love sets like Archives and Heritage Real Ones. Noren never had a Dodgers card issued by Topps during his playing days, but thankfully was honored later in this Heritage set with at least 3 different cards, possibly more.
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,362
This is the biggest haul in a while, thanks to 2 orders that had 25 pieces between them. I think the limit is 10 scans per post, so I am going to have to break this one up. I'll start with those that really need no story or bio. Besides, I could spend all weekend crafting good blurbs to add to each and I have other stuff to do.

Garvey. Two items. One stub and one candid photo about 6'x9". I got both lots mainly for the photos, but the autos were a nice bonus. I certain do not NEED any more Garvey autographs, as I have too many for one sane person already! Garv.jpgs-l1600.jpg

The other is new pitching prospect Dustin May. This is a Topps 582 Montgomery. I can't honestly tell you what that means, but they have some neat retro looking card designs that have caught my eye, including a red framed Muncy auto I featured previously. Had his auto already, but I liked the design and color of this one. It isn't as vibrant as the scan made it appear, as it has a somewhat faded look to it. Still neat. Hopefully he does something good in his career so I don't cry later about dropping $20+ on something that could be a $2 auto someday. May.jpg

To be continued...
 

Latest posts

Top