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MrMopar's New Dodgers Autograph Thread

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Part II of IV

This was a lot of various Dodger stuff. It looked like someone probably lived in LA and went to Dodger games periodically, maybe sent away for some autographs as a kid. Who knows, but I love to find cheaper randon Dodger lots in hopes of scoring some neat stuff in bulk. This lot delivered. It was $20 total and included 8 signed postcards, plus some other crap I am less excited about other than this 5x7 team issued photo packet single of Garvey. I see this particular pose less often than most of them. It dates to 1982, so last one of about 5-6 poses issued before he went to San Diego. Belanger Dodger stuff is cool too. s-l1600.jpg

Anyway, the 8 postcards include one vintage Tommy John, 1 Spanish broadcast team & 6x 1985 & 86 Coke. 3 from each year. I can never tell the two years apart at a glance, but there is a date on the front. Other than that, they are all identical on the back. These are surprisingly hard to find for mid 80s issues. I am fairly certain the team had them made strictly for autograph requests. I do not know if one could obtain a set in one shot, but based on how few there seem to be, I would think not. Included are Carlos Diaz, Ben Hines (coach), Ken Landreaux, Alejandro Pena, Ron Perranoski (coach) and Bill Russell.

i don't think most of these guys really warrant a lengthy write-up, given how many guys arrived today. I am going to feature 2:

Carlos Diaz is a bit harder than a lot of same era guys to find autographs from. "Bimbo", as he was nicknamed by his father when he was a child (after a clown), was originally a Mariners prospect. The Mariners traded him away to the Braves for Jeff Burroughs in 1981. After 19 appearances with the Braves in 1982, they sent him to the Mets in an unexciting deal. He finished the year with 4 appearances and no decisions and then logged in a 3-1 record with a 2.05 ERA and 2 saves in 83 for the Mets. It looked like he was coming around when in December 83, the Mets traded him with Bob Bailor to the Dodgers for Sid Fernandez and some other scrub not worth mentioning. This was an interesting trade in that both Diaz and Fernandez were both born in Hawaii, a very exclusive club in MLB. Sid had that awesome 1984 Donruss rated rookie card that just made him look like he was going to be awesome. That is what 1984 me thought at least. Sid, by the way, appeared in a while 2 games for the 1983 Dodgers and was 0-1. that was his entire Dodger experience, so this trade did not look good for the mets. As it turned out, it was definitely a food deal for the Mets. Diaz only lasted a couple more years with the Dodgers in limited time, although he was 7-3. Sounds like he was just injury prone and was out of baseball before the 1987 season started. He returned to Hawaii and died of a heart attack at age 57 in 2015.1984_donruss_fernandez.jpg

Ben Hines was a batting coach for the Dodgers in 1985-86 and 1988-93. Besides that, there isn't a lot to tell. He had some playing time in the Orioles system in the early 60s and was a college coach as well. Little tidbit, he won a small college world series and a MLB World Series (88 Dodgers), a fairly exclusive club apparently. As far as I can tell, Hines is still alive and is 84. He may be on a Police card, but I think his card selection must be pretty small besides this Coke PC.

The final item is something I was surprised about, because I don't always read ebay descriptions close enough. In this case it was a good thing. I saw the postcard among all the signed Coke PCs, but did not see that it was signed in verso. The price was good enough to warrant winning w/o this knowledge and when the package arrived today, I was pleasantly surprised to see a signature of Rene Cardenas. Now this is right up my alley. Although not as well known in the US as Vin Scully, Jaime Jarrin (who got himself a Topps autographed card this year - Previously featured) and Cardenas are long time Spanish broadcasters for MLB. Jarrin actually trained under Cardenas in 1959, who was MLB's first Spanish language broadcaster. The Colt 45s hired him away in 1961, and he was with Houston until 1975. He returned to his native Nicaragua but he would return to the States in 1981 to broadcast for the Rangers before reuniting once more with Jarrin and the Dodgers from 1982-1998. I believe he is now retired and still alive, at either 89 or 90 (his birth year is apparently unverified). For being the surprise I didn't realize I was getting, this rises to the top and the coolest item in the batch!
s-l1600-1.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Part III of IV

I will now show 10 of 13 Target cards I received. The final 3 will be shown with the last 4 items I got in the 17 item package. The fun of this lot is most of these guys did not have a real Dodger card from their playing days, or after until this all-inclusive Target set was made in 1990. Thank you Target! I just wish they weren't mini sized.

Ed Albosta. He played 2 games for the 1941 Dodgers, getting the loss in both. He served in the Army during WWII and his only other MLB experience was in 1946 with the Pirates in 17 games. The poor guy couldn't catch a break, going 0-6, 0-8 lifetime! He died in 2003 at age 84. Albosta.jpg

Marv Breeding. I mentioned him previously, 20 games for the 1963 Dodgers. He died in 2006 at age 73. Breeding.jpg

Tom Brennan, also previously just mentioned. Brennan.jpg

Pete Mikkelsen, recently mentioned. Died in 2006 at the age of 67. Mikkelsen.jpg

Larry Miller. Miller was 4-8 in 16 games for the 64 Dodgers. He would be traded to the Mets for Dick Smith. Miller died in 2018 at age 80. Miller.jpg

Kevin Pasley. I think I featured Pasley before. He is another Mariner/Dodger connection. Trivia alert. Only 2 MLB players hit a HR on their final career AB and had their number retired. Ted Williams is the first. You guessed it, Kevin Pasley is the last. He hit his only MLB HR in his final career AB. He wore #4 for the Dodgers, but it was obviously noit retired because of him, but rather HOFer Duke Snider, who wore it in the 50s. Pasley.jpg

Boog Powell. Pretty sure this is his only Dodger card. Everyone knows about Boog, but few probably paid attention to the fact he was once a Dodger. He played in 50 games for the 1977 NL Champion Dodgers, mostly as a pinch hitter, but was released before the season ended, thus taking away his change at a final WS appearance. BOOG! Powell.jpg

Bob Ramazzoti. He played a handful of games for the Dodgers between 1946-49, mostly fill in behind the starters Eddie Stanky, Jackie Robinson, etc. He died in 2000 at age 83. Ramazzotti.jpg

Don Ross. He played 10 games for the 1940 Dodgers. He died in 1996 at age 81. They named a baseball card after him in 1981 (Just kidding....or am I?). Ross.jpg

Bill Sayles. A pitcher, he played 5 games for the 1943 Dodgers with no decisions. He died in 1996 at age 79. Sayles.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Part IV of IV

Tom Sunkel. He was 1-4 in 12 games for the 1944 Dodgers. He died in 2002 at age 89. Sunkel.jpg

Carl Warwick. Warwick was drafted by Brooklyn in 1957 and eventually made his debut in LA in 1961 hitting .091 in 19 games . He and Bob Lillis were traded to the Cardinals for Daryl Spencer in early 61. Warwick.jpg

Gary Weiss does have a real card, his 1981 Fleer. Not sure why though. He played 22 games between 1980-81 for the Dodgers. In 1980, he appeared in 8 games. Check out his stats. He scored 2 runs but had 0 ABs. The obvious answer is he was a pinch runner. His entire experience that year was as a pinch runner! Screen Shot 2020-06-12 at 6.03.07 PM.png

The next year the Dodgers let him hit a few times in 14 games. He responded with a .105 batting average. Good Bye Gary! He was out of baseball by the end of 1981 and although The Dodgers were World Champs in 81, Weiss was not on the roster. At least he played MLB ball, right? Weiss.jpg

Here is where is gets a little more interesting, yet a little more boring at the same time. The past 4 autographs are on customized 3x5s cut down to card size.

Hank DeBerry played catcher for Brooklyn from 1922-1930, averaging what looks like around 65-70 games per year, platooning with other catchers. His "best" and busiest season was his first in Brooklyn, where he hit .301 in 85 games. He died in 1951 at age 56. Deberry.jpg

Phil Page was 1-0 in 6 games with the 1934 Dodgers, a short part of a short career spanning 1928-34. He was 3-3 lifetime in 31 games, also playing for Detroit. He died of a heart attack in 1958 at age 52. Page.jpg

James Carlisle "Red" Smith played in Brooklyn from his rookie season 1911-1914. 1913 was a standout year for him, which was the same year his teammate Jake Daubert won the MVP award (although I don't believe it was called that yet). Their stats appear close at first, maybe even the edge going to Smith, but Daubert had 18 more hits in 32 fewer ABs and his .350 BA must have gotten him the award, as the Superbas were a 6th place team that year. Smith ended up with an 11 year career, spending the rest of his career with Boston NL. Smith died in 1966 at age 76. I could see how tracking down a Smith might have been hard for autograph seekers. 4 Red Smith's come up in baseball reference.

Screen Shot 2020-06-12 at 6.23.50 PM.png. Red Smith.jpg

Bill Schardt was a teammate of Red Smith. Schardt played for the Brooklyn club in 1911-12 and that is his only MLB experience. He was 5-16 career. He died in 1964 at age 78. Schardt.jpg

Every once in a while, I get onto an old time Brooklyn kick, especially if one seller is selling multiple items, as was the case here. Most of these guys are not big names, but because they played a long time ago, they also died a long time ago, making signatures harder to find (and pricier). I have no fantasies of completing a Brooklyn signature run. I will just say that although it MAY be possible for one to obtain them all and I don't even know if this is true, for me it would be impossible. I will periodically work back from the 30s-40s-50s, filling in blanks when the prices are reasonable and affordable. I'd say I probably have a decent percentage of the 30s-40s and I think I now have the 50s done.
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Any follow up to yesterday's haul would likely be disappointing, but just one today.

Steve Sax 2019 Archives 86 OPC /48. I have loved this issue since the beginning. Aside from some questionable subjects and a lot of very low serial numbering that can make getting specific cards frustrating, these provide some great buyback cards with on-card autographs that are certified. Even if removed from the case, the serial number and set stamps are still there to provide evidence of the issue's authenticity. Sax.jpg
 

Benjamin04

New member
Jun 13, 2020
1
Part III of IV

I will now show 10 of 13 Target cards I received. The final 3 will be shown with the last 4 items I got in the 17 item package. The fun of this lot is most of these guys did not have a real Dodger card from their playing days, or after until this all-inclusive Target set was made in 1990. Thank you Target! I just wish they weren't mini sized.

Ed Albosta. He played 2 games for the 1941 Dodgers, getting the loss in both. He served in the Army during WWII and his only other MLB experience was in 1946 with the Pirates in 17 games. The poor guy couldn't catch a break, going 0-6, 0-8 lifetime! He died in 2003 at age 84. View attachment 114016

Marv Breeding. I mentioned him previously, 20 games for the 1963 Dodgers. He died in 2006 at age 73. View attachment 114017

Tom Brennan, also previously just mentioned. View attachment 114018

Pete Mikkelsen, recently mentioned. Died in 2006 at the age of 67. View attachment 114019

Larry Miller. Miller was 4-8 in 16 games for the 64 Dodgers. He would be traded to the Mets for Dick Smith. Miller died in 2018 at age 80. View attachment 114020

Kevin Pasley. I think I featured Pasley before. He is another Mariner/Dodger connection. Trivia alert. Only 2 MLB players hit a HR on their final career AB and had their number retired. Ted Williams is the first. You guessed it, Kevin Pasley is the last. He hit his only MLB HR in his final career AB. He wore #4 for the Dodgers, but it was obviously noit retired because of him, but rather HOFer Duke Snider, who wore it in the 50s. View attachment 114021

Boog Powell. Pretty sure this is his only Dodger card. Everyone knows about Boog, but few probably paid attention to the fact he was once a Dodger. He played in 50 games for the 1977 NL Champion Dodgers, mostly as a pinch hitter, but was released before the season ended, thus taking away his change at a final WS appearance. BOOG! View attachment 114022

Bob Ramazzoti. He played a handful of games for the Dodgers between 1946-49, mostly fill in behind the starters Eddie Stanky, Jackie Robinson, etc. He died in 2000 at age 83. View attachment 114023

Don Ross. He played 10 games for the 1940 Dodgers. Paris shuttle He died in 1996 at age 81. They named a baseball card after him in 1981 (Just kidding....or am I?). View attachment 114024

Bill Sayles. A pitcher, he played 5 games for the 1943 Dodgers with no decisions. He died in 1996 at age 79. View attachment 114025
Hello, this is a very beautiful story and a beautiful journey
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Nothing in the mail today, but I forgot to previously post this pick up from COMC. Who knows when I will actually get it, but as I have done in the past, I share COMC purchases when I buy them, instead of when I receive them.

Today's subject is Jose De Leon, not to be confused with former MLB player (also pitcher) Jose DeLeon. De Leon has quite a few certified Dodger cards and yet he has already headed on down the road. After posting a 2-0 record in the 4 games he appeared for the Dodgers in 2016, they traded him in January 2017 for Logan Forsyth. The two wins are a little deceptive, as the Dodgers were in the middle of a 7 year streak where they won their division and usually went on further in the playoffs, only to be eliminated each year. The team was winning a lot of games. De Leon had a 6.75 ERA in 17 IP, and gave up 19 hits (including 5 HR0 and 17 runs! Eventually your offense can't keep up with what the defense is giving up. He only got in one game with the Rays in 2017, a win (1-0). His era was 10.13 in 2.2 innings pitched. Then in 2019, he was 1-0 in 3 games across 4 IP, this time with a much more respectable ERA of 2.25. However, the Rays traded him for cash and a player to be named later in Nov 2019 to the Reds. Maybe he can do better in Cincy, although he is 4-0 career. Jose-De-Leon.jpg

As I wrapped this up, I realized that I had not actually "received" and "recorded" any of my latest COMC purchases, since my big batch was shipped/delivered. The others sitting in the warehouse I have not shared yet are:

Karim Garcia. Garcia had a lot of Dodgers cards. I guess it was the right time and he must have been a touted prospect. In the end, he only spent a small part of 3 seasons on the team, 1995-97, a total of 29 games. His career would last 10 years though, long enough to become eligible for the HOF vote in 2010. Spoiler, he didn't make it! Karim-Garcia.jpg
Koyie Hill. A 3 game veteran of the 2003 Dodgers, Hill was part of the trade that brought Steve Finley and Brent Mayne to the Dodgers. Like Garcia before him, he would stick around long enough to be eligible for the HOF, 11 years in the bigs. He didn't make the HOF either! Koyie-Hill.jpg
Ken Landreaux /25. Landreaux is one of only 2 "stars" of the batch today. 1X AS and 7 year Dodger vet, he was part of the package the Angels gave up in 1979 to get Rod Carew. The Twins then sent him to the Dodgers IN 1981, for essentially Mickey Hatcher (and some other players of no interest to anyone, including myself). Ken-Landreaux.jpg
Paul Lo Duca. I think this one was /50. Lo Duca is the other star of the batch, also playing 7 years for the Dodgers (2X AS), before being dealt to the Marlins in 2004. The Dodgers got Brad Penny out of the deal, which included several players. After a short stay in Miami, he was sent to the Mets. This all sounds very similar to another former Dodger catcher before him! Lo Duca would go on make 2 more AS rosters, 1 each with the Mets and the Marlins. Paul-Lo-Duca.jpg
Adam Riggs. Riggs played 9 games for the 1997 Dodgers. He wasn't even involved in a trade I can mention. Not much else to say, but he did play for the Dodgers and even has several certified cards to collect. This might be his best. Adam-Riggs.jpg
 
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mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
The calm before the storm! I have a lot of stuff in the hopper, waiting to arrive.

Mike Garman - This has a custom feel to it. It is blank back, but maybe it was a legit issue? Weird that he is shown as a Dodger in text, but the image is that of a Cardinal hat. I like oddball, so I was drawn to this...and it was cheap! Garman began his MLB career in Boston in 1969, eventually he was traded to the Cardinals in 1973 and then on to the Cubs in 1975. He came to the Dodgers from the Cubs in 1977 with Rick Monday for Ivan DeJesus, Bill Buckner and a minor leaguer. He played the entire 1977 season for the Dodgers in mainly a reliever role and so, he had himself a 78 Topps card as a Dodger, my first introduction to him. He played a partial season in 78 and was then traded to the Expos for Gerry Hannahs and Larry Landrith. Landrith never played for the Dodgers. Hannahs got into just 5 games in 1978-79 and he was done. Garman's career ended in Montreal in 1978. Garman.jpg

This one was a gift from Therion (Thank you!). Cy Buker on a Fritsch OYW (One Year Wonder) card from 1977. Buker played just one year, 1945, for the Dodgers. He was 7-2 with a 3.30 ERA in 42 games. He saved 5 games as well. Seems like he did pretty good, but that would be it for his MLB time. He died in 2011 at age 93. IMG_6849.jpg
 
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mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
The storm has started!

First one is a COMC purchase. Steve Yeager. Steve-Yeager.jpg

Now for Friday mail day. Garvey redemption /25. Boring caterpillar now, but this will turn into a butterfly soon. Garvey Redemption.jpg

DJ Peters /15. This kid is 6'6" and 23 years old. He has not cracked the MLB yet. Hopefully he does eventually at least debut for the Dodgers. Still a deal for under $5! Peters.jpg

Steve Sax Blue /25. This completes the basic 4 card parallel run (base, purple, silver and blue). Have not seen the gold 1/1 yet. I would like to get it eventually, but have still never seen the Mota from 2017! Sax.jpg

Roy Gleason Target card. You have to read about this guy if you have never heard of him. He was featured in one of the Fritsch OYW sets and never really did much in baseball, but he was more famous for his time in Vietnam. I thought I once read where he was the only player who reached the MLB level and then was sent to Vietnam. Many players served in the Vietnam war, but I believe most, if not all, were in the minor league systems at the time they were sent, except Gleason. He was awarded a purple heart after an injury sustained in combat. s-l500.jpg

Jim Gentile. This is the only Dodger card Gentile has, I believe, like so many other short timers. He is one of only 15 surviving members of the Brooklyn Dodgers now, and one of the youngest at age 86. His birthday was 6/3. s-l500-1.jpg

Tom Brennan Coke PC. Brennan signed as a free agent in 1985 and appeared in 12 games for the team in his final season. He was 1-3 with a 7.39 ERA. Brennan PC.jpg

Don Lund PC. He played 15 games for the 1945 & 1947 Dodgers. He died in 2013 at age 90.Lund.jpg

Randy Moore PC. Moore played 55 games for the 1936-37 Dodgers. He was part of the trade that sent future HOF manager Al Lopez to the Braves. Moore died in 1992 at age 85. Moore.jpg

Art Parks PC. I did not know this until right now, but Pee Wee Reese started his career with the Red Sox organization, although he was a career Dodger at the MLB level. Parks was one of the players the Dodgers sent to Boston to finish up the Reese trade! Parks would never play for Boston, as he only appeared at the major league level in 1937 & 1939 for the Dodgers. He played a total of 78 games for the Brooklyn club. He died in 1989 at age 78. Parks.jpg

...and to be continued as I have reached 10 scans.
 
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mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Part II of III

Dixie Walker. Got this one pretty cheap, presumably because the ink ran low and either Walker or someone else after the fact, completed the signature in a different ink. I have others, so it is not a concern for me. Walker was one of the bigger Dodger stars in the 40s. A southern boy from Georgia, he was on the team when they brought in Jackie Robinson. Not a fan at first, it sounds like he later warmed up to his teammate that year. However the 5X AS was traded to the Pirates after the 47 season, in a deal that brought Billy Cox, Preacher Roe and Gene Mauch to Brooklyn. He died in 1982 at age 71. Walker.jpg

Max Butcher. Butcher pitched for the Dodgers from his rookie season 1936, until 1938 when he was traded for Wayne LeMaster. Butcher died in 1957 at age 46, apparently from liver disease. This item has a bonus signature on back. I noticed it as I held up the card. Someone made this into a card sized cut and glued the signature to an index card. However, and thankfully, the glue was not super sticky and the paper with the signature came free easily. Although not shown, I can also count this as...

Ira Hutchinson, signed on back of the Max Butcher cut. Hutchinson was 5-2 for the 1939 Dodgers. He died in 1973 at age 62, so a pretty decent item to just forfeit as being glued down to an index card. Butcher.jpg

Jud Daley played 2 years for the Brooklyn team in 1911-12. In 80 games between the 2 seasons, the outfielder hit .250. He died in 1967 at age 82. Daley.jpg

Gene Hildebrand's only MLB experience was 11 games for the 1902 Brooklyn Superbas, but he later had a long career as an umpire from 1913-1934. It is reported that he may have been instrumental in either creating and/or perfecting the spitball by teaching a couple early teammates the concept. He died in 1960 at age 81. Hildebrand.jpg

Doug McWeeny pitched for Brooklyn between 1926-29, compiling a 33-45 record. He died in 1953 at age 56. McWeeny.jpg

Chuck Ward was an back-up infielder for Brooklyn from 1918-22. He died in 1969 at age 74. His trivia tidbit is that in his rookie campaign of 1917, he took over primary SS duties from 43 year old Honus Wagner, who retired at the end of that season. Ward.jpg

to be continued...
 

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mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Part III of III

last item of the day is a 1972 Los Angeles Dodgers team signed baseball. Signatures include:

Walt Alston (deceased)
Manny Mota
Steve Garvey
Tommy John
Frank Robinson (deceased)
Maury Wills
Lee Lacy
Chris Cannizzaro (deceased)
Pete Mikkelsen (deceased)
Pete Richert
Dick Dietz (deceased)
Don Sutton
Mike Strahler (deceased)
Hoyt Wilhelm (deceased)
Jim Brewer (deceased)
Jim Lefebvre
Claude Osteen
Bill Buckner (deceased)
Bill Russell
Al Downing

The ball is nice, other that a small gouge between Lacy and Cannizzaro signatures, barely affecting either. There is also an indentation in part of the Garvey signature, but otherwise the signatures are bold. A nice piece that features both future HOFers who made very brief stops in LA in 1972, Robinson and Wilhelm, along with future Dodgers HOFers Sutton and Alston. Several other star players included as well. The ball is nicer than it presents in these photos, which makes buying signed baseballs tricky when you can't see them.

B5.jpgB1.jpgB3.jpgB4.jpgs-l500.jpg
 

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mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
A trio of forgetful Dodgers pitchers today. I thought the big storm was coming today after Fridays haul and nothing Saturday, but a small patch of clearing before she blows in again....

Morgan Cooper - I can't even find where he is even in baseball, nor any minor league stats. Sounds like the guy is a walking injury. He is shown as a Dodger, so he is on the list. Cooper.jpg

Elmer Dessens. Born in Mexico, he was a starter early in his career. Eventually though, this well travelled pitcher settled into a relief role for most of the remainder of his time in the bigs. He did last 14 seasons though and played with 9 clubs from 1996-2010. He spent parts of 2004 and 2006 sandwiched between a full 2005 season in LA. In 59 games, we was 2-3 in about 110 innings. His lifetime record was 52-64. Dessens.jpg

Braydon Fisher. I think this guy is already out of baseball. His only stats are from 2018 with the Arizona rookie leaguer Dodgers. No MLB experience, but he has a Bowman Dodgers card. This is the good and bad of Bowman all at the same time. Cool that he got a card, but bad that the kid barely made it onto the ladder before falling off! There are a handful of players who got Dodger cards but either never played in the majors or were traded before making their debuts. I still consider these guys an important part of the collecting and will go after ANYONE with a licensed Dodger card. I draw the line with guys who only have a minor league card with the Dodgers (that never made it to MLB), unless they are CHEAP though. Sometimes these guys are harder to get than stars though, if they fade into obscurity and have no interest in responding to fan mail.Fisher.jpg
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
I guess not finding him in baseball was a "cut the corner" lazy answer. He didn't show up on baseball,-reference for any minor league stats, but I did see an article that mentioned he was with the Raptors. He has yet to play a professional game though, since leaving college in 2017. Maybe next year?
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
I was promising a storm and here is the first leg. This will be PART I of ? posts...

1977 Dodgers team signed baseball, includes:

Tommy Lasorda
Jim Gilliam (Deceased)
Lance Rautzhan (Deceased)
Preston Gomez (Deceased)
Lee Lacy
Ed Goodson
Monty Basgall (Deceased)
Steve Yeager
Steve Garvey
Mark Creese
Tommy John
Doug Rau
Davey Lopes
Glenn Burke (Deceased)
Don Sutton
Dusty Baker
Rafael Landestoy
Bill Russell
Burt Hooton
Jerry Grote
Mike Garman
Rick Monday
Rick Rhoden
Reggie Smith
Ron Cey

77-1.jpg77-3.jpg77-5.jpg77-2.jpg77-4.jpg77-6.jpg

To be continued...
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
PART II OF ?

1980 Dodgers team baseball, includes:

Tommy Lasorda
Danny Ozark (Deceased)
Rick Sutcliffe
Joe Ferguson
Mark Creese
Jerry Reuss
Darrell Thomas
Davey Lopes
Jay Johnstone
Terry Forster
Burt Hooton
Monty Basgall (Deceased)
Dusty Baker
Ron Cey
Don Stanhouse
Red Adams (Deceased)
Dave Goltz
Rudy Law
Steve Howe (Deceased)
Bill Russell
Reggie Smith
Bob Welch (Deceased)

I am surprised to see Garvey missing from the 80 Ball. There are guys you see on most partial and full team balls and he is one of them.

80-1.jpg80-5.jpg80-4.jpg80-2.jpg80-6.jpg80-3.jpg

To be continued...
 

mrmopar

Member
Jan 19, 2010
3,371
Part III of ?

Steve Garvey newspaper ad he took out to thank fans after leaving LA. Garvey Newspaper.jpg

Early Garvey 3X5. I prefer these early versions, as his signature has gotten much sloppier today. He once had one of the better signatures out there. Garvey 3x5.jpg

Del Bissonette. Bissonette.jpg

Bruce Caldwell. I almost passed on this one, as it is very hard to see pencil signature on a dark background, but decided to go for it. He played 7 games for the 1932 Dodgers and died of cancer in 1959 at age 53. Caldwell.jpg

Nick Cullop. He played 13 games for the 1929 Dodgers. Best known for a very long and successful minor league career, with 400+ HRs and 1800+ RBIs. He died in 1978 at age 78. Cullop.jpg

George Cutshaw. Cutshaw was an early Brooklyn star, their primary 2B from 1912-1917. When he was traded to Pittsburgh in 1918, he wes sent with future HOF Casey Stengel and the Robins picked up future HOFer Burleigh Grimes. Grimes would come out of the gate with 19 wins and also produce four 20+ W seasons in his 9 years in Brooklyn. Cutshaw died in 1973 at age 87. Cutshaw.jpg

Carl Doyle. Doyle appear in 8 games with the 1939-40 Dodgers, going 1-2. He was part of the trade that sent him and 3 others to St. Louis for future HOFer Joe Medwick and Curt Davis. Doyle died from a pulmonary infarction (per wiki) at age 39 in 1951. Doyle.jpg

Red Evans. He was 1-8 for the 1939 Dodgers, his only year with the team. Evans was one of 3 (?) players to be named later that the Dodgers sent to the Red Sox for Pee Wee Reese. BR doesn't list the other two players, so maybe they were minor leaguers or Evans was the only one that actually was sent as part of the transaction. He died in 1982 at age 75. Evans.jpg

Charlie Gilbert. Gilbert was a rookie for the 1940 Dodgers. After appearing in 57 games that year, the Dodger sent him, Johnny Hudson & $65K to the Cubs for future HOFer Billy Herman. Herman was approaching the end of hisa career and would lose 2 years to the war, but had 2 AS seasons for Brooklyn, including 1943 when he hit .330 and drove in 100 runs for the Bums. Gilbert died in 1983 at age 64. Gilbert.jpg

To be continued...
 

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