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RIP Prince

RNCoyote

Well-known member
Nov 4, 2009
1,027
Texas
Another favorites of mines gone. Simply fantastic with uncanny musical artistic ability. RIP Prince


Also my tribute to him
Rain.jpg
 

hive17

Active member
Aug 7, 2008
21,313
On the heels of the Janet Jackson thing, I'm sure the NFL didn't appreciate Prince's simulated masturbation during the halftime show. What seems like the NFL not having taste in music is the NFL trying to find halftime acts that are unlikely to do something during the show to harm the shield.
It's still one of the greatest shows ever.
 

rsmath

Active member
Nov 8, 2008
6,084
Sad to see that Prince is gone. I'm sure his archives are packed full of unreleased stuff and will make it out for all to hear some day.
From a business perspective, I'd like to see how the business side of things works out. You don't hear about family in all the Prince news, so I don't know how someone will be picked or chosen to represent the estate for the affairs of merchandising, music archive releases, etc.

I just heard today about Prince writing a memoir. I wonder if he got started and if so, will it come out as written or if someone will have to clean it up and add a brief ending since I'm sure noone wants to read about the rest of prince's life after the incomplete memoir ends.
 

RStadlerASU22

Active member
Jan 2, 2013
8,875
Wy wife was a fan of his much more than I (she grew up in MN), but still respect his craft and influence. The Chapelle show had a funny skit where they were playing basketball and Prince kicked everyone's ass. A few others that were great too. Anyway, always sucks when someone is lost, and he def seems to have a nice following.

Ryan
 

tpeichel

Well-known member
Oct 10, 2008
15,481
I have to admit, I am a little obsessed with Prince. Growing up in Minnesota, it was almost unavoidable. Minnesotans love their own and he remained a true Minnesotan to the end. Hell, he even wrote a song for the Vikings. (It is pretty cheesy.)

I went to my first stadium concert with my first girlfriend when I was in middle school to see Prince on his Purple Rain tour. Still remember the beginning of the show clear as day.

In complete blackness, you heard Prince starting his mini sermon, "Dearly beloved, we gather hear today to get through this thing called life..." And then the blasted opening guitar riff kicking off "Let's Go Crazy"... absolutely electric. If there is a better opening for a show, I haven't heard it.

The only good thing about Prince's death is that his stuff is coming back onto youtube. If you haven't seen it watch this performance from the Rock & Roll HOF in 2004 and be blown away:

http://verbnews.com/2015/01/in-2004...uitar-solo-of-all-time-heres-how-it-happened/

These are all great performances. There are others, too. But the single greatest moment in Hall of Fame history happened in 2004, when the remnants of the Traveling Wilburys gathered to celebrate their former bandmate, the late George Harrison. That night, Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne joined Steve Winwood, Dhani Harrison, and Prince for an epic version of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.” Released in 1968, on the Beatles’ eponymous double LP (The White Album), “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” features lyrics that, according to Harrison, were inspired by the eastern concept of relativity, as well as a blistering guitar solo performed by Eric Clapton. It is not the best Beatles song — but “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” was the perfect way to sum up the late, great guitarist’s career.

Arguing about guitar solos is like arguing about any other kind of art: highly entertaining and ultimately futile. The history of rock and roll is filled with memorable solos, and choosing one that stands above the rest is a Herculean task. Jimmy Page’s solo on “Stairway To Heaven” is brilliant, as is Jimi Hendrix’s descent into madness on his cover of “All Along the Watchtower.” There is a strong case to be made for Chuck Berry’s concise breakdown on “Johnny B. Goode.” It’s the same story with Duane Allman’s blazing lead on “Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad” and Neil Young’s iconic one-note solo on “Cinnamon Girl.” These are all great guitar solos. But they pale in comparison to what came out of the Purple One’s amplifier that night in 2004.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y
As the video above shows, when the band, cobbled together for the night’s festivities, launches into the song, there is nothing to suggest that the performance will be extraordinary. Petty and Lynne trade the lead, Marc Maron plays a sizzling solo, and Dhani Harrison bangs away on his acoustic guitar, a grin splitting his narrow face. Then, during the coda, Prince emerges from the shadows at the side of the stage. Clad in a dark suit, a crimson shirt, and a preposterous red hat, and armed with a butterscotch Telecaster clone, he cuts a striking figure. Then he starts to play.

The second-most-famous artist to come out of Minnesota is a first-rate guitar player. Prince is comfortable playing everything from funk and soul to pop and savage rock and roll. His guitar work is instantly recognizable, powerful, and laced with emotion. At the same time, his fretboard histrionics are often overshadowed by his persona (though not by his 5’1” frame). Prince may be a talented musician and songwriter, but he is best known for being extremely reclusive and not doing things; his ability to transform an ordinary guitar into an instrument of rock and roll magic is frequently overlooked. Which is part of the reason why his performance at the Hall of Fame was so extraordinary. Everyone expects Prince to be good. Great, even. But few assume he will be transcendental.

From a technical perspective, Prince’s three-minute solo is not particularly impressive. He starts with a few monster bends before settling into a series of straightforward blues licks. It’s not fancy; it doesn’t have to be. What makes Prince such a good player is his ability to inject every note with feeling. This is easier to hear than to describe, but it’s worth noting that it involves something more than playing a bunch of notes. And just when it seems like he’s run the tank dry, the diminutive guitarist ratchets up the intensity, drawing on an apparently limitless reserve of energy. Every note that comes out of his amplifier is saturated with emotion, carried aloft by the sheer joy of uninhibited rock and roll.

It is not enough to simply play a great guitar solo. Convention demands posturing, and Prince delivers a masterclass in making playing guitar look cool. His movements are tight and focused, almost economical. His arm is a piston, making the sort of precise pumping motion you’d expect to see in a manufacturing plant. His whole body is tightly-coiled, like a spring straining against itself, ready to burst in a torrent of chaotic noise. A minute or so into the solo, he turns to face Dhani Harrison — and allows himself to crumple off the front of the stage and into the arms of a burly man whose job description clearly includes a line about “supporting Prince when he wants to feign exhaustion.” After being pushed back to his feet, he cranks up the intensity once again.
The final flourish comes at the end of the song, as the chorus fades into silence. That’s when Prince, judging the moment perfectly, shrugs off his guitar and launches it into the air. As the instrument soars across the stage, he turns and saunters into the wings, a sly grin spreading across his face. It’s an extraordinary gesture, a moment shared by artist and audience that could only come at the end of a truly remarkable performance. It’s better than any rapturous applause or standing ovation; it’s a moment of musical perfection that, because the cameras miss the plummeting guitar, never has to end. Prince may be an inscrutable and deeply perplexing artist, but he is also one of the finest guitar players ever to walk the earth. And, in three minutes in 2004, he showed everyone what, exactly, that means
 

rsmath

Active member
Nov 8, 2008
6,084
So he might have had pain killers without a prescription, sounded like something us regular folks would end up locked up for
I'm sure he had prescriptions as he had the resources to doctor shop. Still waiting with baited breath for the toxicology report to see what kind of chemistry set Prince had going on. All his supporters keep claiming Prince ran a clean life and wouldn't abuse his body, etc. Guess they are trying to protect his legacy to keep us from thinking he is the newest in the list of celebs who drugged themselves to premature death.
 

phillyfan0417

Active member
Administrator
I'm sure he had prescriptions as he had the resources to doctor shop. Still waiting with baited breath for the toxicology report to see what kind of chemistry set Prince had going on. All his supporters keep claiming Prince ran a clean life and wouldn't abuse his body, etc. Guess they are trying to protect his legacy to keep us from thinking he is the newest in the list of celebs who drugged themselves to premature death.

You seem to be lying in wait to pass judgment with no real information. Based on your posting history I shouldn't be surprised. I'm not sure why people care so much since it changes nothing about his art...well, except for those who want to judge.

Also, you really think prince needed to doctor shop? LOL
 

rsmath

Active member
Nov 8, 2008
6,084
I'm not sure why people care so much since it changes nothing about his art...
why do people so overblow his art since his death? He's still being talked about and he ain't no Michael Jackson where it was understandable to have his death talked about so often when it happened and we still see tidbits even today about his death!

Prince only had 5 Billboard Hot 100 chart-topping singles, MJ had 12. MJ had a Panini release about him, Prince hasn't. The only things MJ and Prince had in common was death by stupidity and both were wackos in their personal life.
 

phillyfan0417

Active member
Administrator
why do people so overblow his art since his death? He's still being talked about and he ain't no Michael Jackson where it was understandable to have his death talked about so often when it happened and we still see tidbits even today about his death!

Prince only had 5 Billboard Hot 100 chart-topping singles, MJ had 12. MJ had a Panini release about him, Prince hasn't. The only things MJ and Prince had in common was death by stupidity and both were wackos in their personal life.
LOL.

Ok.

Sent from my SM-G920P using Freedom Card Board mobile app
 

tpeichel

Well-known member
Oct 10, 2008
15,481
why do people so overblow his art since his death? He's still being talked about and he ain't no Michael Jackson where it was understandable to have his death talked about so often when it happened and we still see tidbits even today about his death!

Prince only had 5 Billboard Hot 100 chart-topping singles, MJ had 12. MJ had a Panini release about him, Prince hasn't. The only things MJ and Prince had in common was death by stupidity and both were wackos in their personal life.
He wrote the songs, played all the instruments, produced all the songs and was an amazing performer. Other than that, nothing special.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/28/arts/music/the-wisdom-of-prince-as-told-by-his-collaborators.html

In the days since Prince died at Paisley Park, many of his collaborators have reflected on his remarkable talents onstage and in the studio, and come to the same conclusion: The artist’s legacy is much greater than the public realizes.

Beyond Prince’s own powers as a live performer (his flair, stagecraft and stamina) and a studio artist (his curiosity, productivity and virtuosic command over nearly every instrument), few artists have championed and mentored other musicians so consistently. He assembled groups like the Time and Vanity 6 and remained engaged with up-and-comers — particularly groups featuring women songwriters — asking acts including Janelle Monáe and King to open at his shows. We talked to several collaborators from across his career about what they learned from working with Prince.

Sheila E. first played with Prince when both musicians were barely 20, jamming next to the water bed in her parents’ Oakland basement. She soon joined him in the studio and had to adjust to a loose process unlike anything she had previously encountered. When she began to engineer some of their sessions, Prince forced her to rethink the conventional way of recording.

“I was used to other artists taking two hours to get a great drum sound, making sure it’s clean. Prince was completely different. A lot of the times he’d just count off tempo and start playing. He’d have some notes, but we’d just play and he’d sing a chorus. He loved that. If the drums were rattling, then that was the sound of it.

I remember during Sign o’ the Times, since I was the musical director, I was there for all the recordings, I knew where everything was in the mix. A normal person would just put guitar on the guitar track and bass just on the bass track, but he would record sometimes five different little things between those tracks. And you’re thinking, ‘Where is that coming from?’ Every track wasn’t just what it said it was.”
Three years later, keyboardist Morris Hayes arrived at Paisley Park as a production assistant. Under Prince’s tutelage, he eventually became not just a member of the New Power Generation but the band’s most senior member.
“I was just one of those church cats that played music by ear, so at first it was very difficult for me to keep up. We wouldn’t just learn one song, we’d learn a string of songs, and when we’d come back the next day I’d forget some. I remember he pulled me to the side and said, ‘Are you a genius, Morris?’ I said no. ‘O.K., then write it down. I don’t write it down ‘cause I’m a genius. I’ve got a million of ‘em, and I can remember. But unless you’re a genius, write it down.’ He gave you that extreme focus, where you knew you had to really come with it.”

 

gt2590

Super Moderator
Aug 17, 2008
34,542
Near Philly
why do people so overblow his art since his death? He's still being talked about and he ain't no Michael Jackson where it was understandable to have his death talked about so often when it happened and we still see tidbits even today about his death!

Prince only had 5 Billboard Hot 100 chart-topping singles, MJ had 12. MJ had a Panini release about him, Prince hasn't.
So, Mariah Carey (18) and Rihanna (13) are better Singers than either of 'em? And Springsteen?

Taylor Swift soon will be there too. IF you're judging musical talent by BB Hot 100 Singles, you're missing a ton of great music...
 

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