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Bud Selig's legacy...should he accept a lifetime ban upon retirement?

HumbleBob

Member
Aug 2, 2009
90
I have always thought that coaches, owners and the commish should also have mandatory testing themselves
 

200lbhockeyplayer

Active member
Aug 10, 2008
11,048
There's no reason to make excuses for players as they're the ones responsible for their own actions and nobody else.

ESPN has a nice article here that shows how clean players are finally waking up. And their waking up had nothing to do with Selig.

The only reason to punish Bud is if he was the one who sold or injected PEDs to players.
I don't think anyone needs to make any excuses for the players...none at all. Those that used had countless reasons to use.

But the last thing we can do is paint Selig as some white knight looking for PED justice. Selig made little attempt to clean up the game as an owner when Vincent brought steroids, and little effort to clean the game as commissioner until Congress called and magnified when Bonds jumped into Hank Aaron's rear-view mirror.
 

uniquebaseballcards

New member
Nov 12, 2008
6,783
I don't think anyone needs to make any excuses for the players...none at all. Those that used had countless reasons to use.

But the last thing we can do is paint Selig as some white knight looking for PED justice. Selig made little attempt to clean up the game as an owner when Vincent brought steroids, and little effort to clean the game as commissioner until Congress called and magnified when Bonds jumped into Hank Aaron's rear-view mirror.
Players that used also had reasons not to use but did out of their own selfishness... but it doesn't really matter.

Bud's doing what he should be doing... he can't do it alone and there's nothing that says what he could have done before would've been an effective deterrent.

The best possible outcome for this whole mess is to have players self-police and to have the establishment discourage PED use, and that's what's starting to happen. Finally. But note players themselves are (more than) half the answer and player support is finally starting to come around.
 

Mighty Bombjack

Active member
Aug 7, 2008
6,097
Players that used also had reasons not to use but did out of their own selfishness... but it doesn't really matter.

Bud's doing what he should be doing... he can't do it alone and there's nothing that says what he could have done before would've been an effective deterrent.

The best possible outcome for this whole mess is to have players self-police and to have the establishment discourage PED use, and that's what's starting to happen. Finally. But note players themselves are (more than) half the answer and player support is finally starting to come around.
MLB (which is nothing but a collection of team owners) LOVED the hell out of PED use in 1998 and since. The most powerful among them is strongly against them now because it is in their direct economic interest to be so.

If they are serious about cleaning up the game, than let them share the brunt of failed tests going forward. Let's put any money that is forfeited by a player due to PWED suspension be paid to a charity (why not one focused on preventing drug use in teenage athletes). This is the true way to clean up the game.

Think about this: the Blue Jays took little risk in signing Melky Cabrera in terms of PED use. If he failed another test, they can save that money and replace him. If the team had to continue to pay his salary (but without his services), then they would NOT contractually reward prior PED use the way they have been. Cabrera might have gotten a million or so to play this year, and his contract may have included an individualized testing regimen designed to protect the Blue Jay's investment.

That would require the teams actully wanting to clean up the problem, so we won't see that anytime soon.
 

uniquebaseballcards

New member
Nov 12, 2008
6,783
MLB (which is nothing but a collection of team owners) LOVED the hell out of PED use in 1998 and since. The most powerful among them is strongly against them now because it is in their direct economic interest to be so.

If they are serious about cleaning up the game, than let them share the brunt of failed tests going forward. Let's put any money that is forfeited by a player due to PWED suspension be paid to a charity (why not one focused on preventing drug use in teenage athletes). This is the true way to clean up the game.

Think about this: the Blue Jays took little risk in signing Melky Cabrera in terms of PED use. If he failed another test, they can save that money and replace him. If the team had to continue to pay his salary (but without his services), then they would NOT contractually reward prior PED use the way they have been. Cabrera might have gotten a million or so to play this year, and his contract may have included an individualized testing regimen designed to protect the Blue Jay's investment.

That would require the teams actully wanting to clean up the problem, so we won't see that anytime soon.
Sure, this is an interesting approach that could work with tweaking. In the end a real solution is going to require players and owners/MLB working together.
 

200lbhockeyplayer

Active member
Aug 10, 2008
11,048
MLB (which is nothing but a collection of team owners) LOVED the hell out of PED use in 1998 and since. The most powerful among them is strongly against them now because it is in their direct economic interest to be so.

If they are serious about cleaning up the game, than let them share the brunt of failed tests going forward. Let's put any money that is forfeited by a player due to PWED suspension be paid to a charity (why not one focused on preventing drug use in teenage athletes). This is the true way to clean up the game.

Think about this: the Blue Jays took little risk in signing Melky Cabrera in terms of PED use. If he failed another test, they can save that money and replace him. If the team had to continue to pay his salary (but without his services), then they would NOT contractually reward prior PED use the way they have been. Cabrera might have gotten a million or so to play this year, and his contract may have included an individualized testing regimen designed to protect the Blue Jay's investment.

That would require the teams actully wanting to clean up the problem, so we won't see that anytime soon.
I like this approach.
 

Brewer Andy

Active member
Aug 10, 2008
9,629
I've never understood those who want to pin so much blame on one person who represents 30 which make up half of any bargaining agreement. History will be kinder to Bud than we are I think. Sure he deserves some blame but likely so do each of us reading. And are we still talking about Bud owning a team? He hasn't been involved with them since 1998 and his family sold out almost 9 years ago.
And what exactly are people angry about? That it took him so long to do anything? That was definitely a failing yes, but if that's it what will make up for that? Continuing to do nothing? Just stepping down?
 
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MeteoriteGuy

New member
Aug 6, 2013
7
Selig turned a blind eye and made millions. He gets a big piece of pie in the blame because he was the man on top.

Drugs have been in sports from the very beginning, they just got better the last decade+. Selig or anyone else pretending otherwise is just lying to you, or to themselves. Selig you might remember testified in front of congress in the 70s on this issue, so he understood there was/is a problem. How come the first real public action Selig did, was not stand for Bonds home run. I put MUCH more blame on Selig then say Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens. His fate with the HOF, should be tied with theirs.
 
Bud Selig has been a pox on the game!

The strike

Cancellation of the World Series

Not gaining control of the steroid issue

the joke of an all star game with a tie

The ownership of the Red Sox (most questionable thing in my opinion)

Black balling of mark Cuban

Not expanding instant replay

No penalties levied against the marlins for their roster build up and subsequent fire sale after stadium was built.

4 teams filing bk since 93

This arod ped inquisition

I hope bud gets optical herpes!
 

nappyd

Active member
Sep 24, 2012
1,201
He should have to be WNBA commish or NHL......ok, that may be an improvement over Bettman.
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,386
I have very little issue with Selig regarding steroids. The way I see it he was in a no-win situation. While it is true that early on he turned a blind eye to steroids, what should he have done? At that time there was no public outrage for steroids, the player's union was strongly supporting its players including those who used steroids and just imagine if he would have tried to suspend Bonds, McGwire, Sosa or any of the other guys back in the early 00's; there would have been riots and people would have been calling for his head. I don't think there was anything he could have done other than take a wait and see approach to see what the public's viewpoint would be on it. (Meanwhile we are at the 00's point for the NFL and possibly other sports leagues and for some reason we are happy that they are not making a big stink over 'roids.)
 

ballerskrip

New member
Aug 7, 2008
11,531
Chicago Area
I really can't understand why so many people hate Bud Selig.

1. He created interleague play (admit it, baseball was getting STALE without it)

2. He added the Wild Card - Ummm awesome

3. He has implemented a very strict drug testing policy. If everyone here believes that steroids were running rampant in the 80's and 90's, which they were, why not point the finger at previous commissioners? Why weren't amphetimenes tested for 30 years ago? Or any PED, etc for that matter?

4. Baseball revenues are at an time high overall

Point the finger at Bud all you want, but many people act as if the commish can just willy nilly do whatever he. Every heard of collective Bargaining? The players Union? Come on. Get real.

skrip
 

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