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My Line-Up Card Collection - 12/29/2019 - Pedro 1st win

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
I've posted in some random threads about these, but thought I would share these in a single thread.

Rule 4.03 in in the official MLB rule book discusses the exchange of line-up cards. Each team's manager provides the umpire with his line-up in duplicate. A copy from each team is kept by the umpire and a copy is given to the manager of the other team. This process establishes the batting order for each team and teams are not allowed to bat out of order.

What this means is that for each game there are 3 line-up cards for each team. Generally there is one hand-written copy and 2 carbon copies that are used. Line-up cards have been used since the 1930's and possibly earlier since the rule that line-ups need to be in place before the game existed before 1900.

A couple of years back I came across a couple of line-up cards on eBay and thought it would make a really cool collection. I decided to focus primarily on managers who have made the HOF (whether due to their career as a manager, player or any other reason). There are always some line-up cards floating around eBay, but they are surprisingly hard to find, even for fairly modern managers.

I've been able to find quite a few of the modern managers including Bobby Cox, Sparky Anderson, Dick Williams, Tony LaRussa (from the 98 team on which McGwire broke the HR record). I've also been able to pick up a couple from a little earlier including Whitey Herzog (from the WS Champion season in 1982 and an Al (Red) Schoendienst from 1971. From that era I was also able to pick up a really nice Ted Williams signed line-up card from his time managing the Texas Rangers.

Going back a little further I've been lucky enough to find a few from players that I imagine only a few still exist (I assume back in the day given the flimsy paper these were written on and the fact that no one assumed any of this would be worth something, that very few were preserved.)

One is a Lefty O'Doul line-up card from when he managed the San Francisco Seals back in 1950. The Seals played in the Independent League on the Pacific Coast League from 1903 until 1957 when the Giants moved to San Francisco.

The other two were the first 2 that got me started on this collection and come from the 1930's. One is signed by HOF manager Bucky Harris, and the other by one of the greatest pitchers of all-time: Walter Johnson.

I have a couple more on their way in and look forward to sharing. I find this a super interesting item to collect and they are really challenging to hunt down.

I also have quite a few copies of more modern line-up cards (including many carbon copies) that I'd be happy to trade if anyone has any one's that I need (or potentially sell in the right situation).
 

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Zan

New member
Aug 12, 2008
3,067
NY, NY
Wow, very amazing collection. Certainly expands on your HOF theme. Very much looking forward to seeing more of your pickups
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
Very unique collection. Congrats.
Thank you! I'm obviously a big fan of them!


I'd recognize that "Williams" signature anywhere. Super cool collection.
I find it fascinating to how some of the greatest players performed as managers.

Wow, very amazing collection. Certainly expands on your HOF theme. Very much looking forward to seeing more of your pickups
I am as well. Have a couple incoming that I look forward to sharing.


Who the one *or two, you would really like to add some time?

Ryan

Sent from my SM-G920V using Freedom Card Board mobile app
Connie Mack is one I would love to add as he was a legendary manager and had a huge impact on the game (crazy that his MLB career ran from the 1890's to 1950!)

Walt Alston is another. A part of my collection focuses on the integration and Alston was very involved in the early integration days. He managed the 1946 Nashua Dodgers who had Campanella and Newcombe on the team (46 was the first year that African Americans were in baseball since back in the 1800's... Jackie Robinson spent that season playing for the Montreal Royals).

A huge number of the biggest names from the early days of baseball were managers like Ty Cobb, Cy Young and others, but I'm not quite sure when they started using line-up cards, and it's hard to imagine too many would have survived from back then, so for many players I really don't know if they even exist.

Those are a great idea for a collection and you have some great ones there already!
Thanks! I was really lucky to find the Johnson and Bucky Harris which got me off to a great start. Since then I've had a bit of help from a couple of people on another message boards which focuses more on these kinds of items.

I also collect line-up cards and this is a fantastic collection!
Thank you! You had that Adam Dunn pitching one, did you not? Really cool piece!
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
These came in the mail today. I had posted this in the pick-up thread but will post them here again.


Before Casey Stengel was a Yankee legend he managed in the Pacific Coast League, which was an independent league on the West Coast before the MLB moved out there.

As Wikipedia explains: "The 1948 Oaks were nicknamed the "Nine Old Men" in that many of the star players were older veterans of the major leagues, including Ernie Lombardi, Cookie Lavagetto, Nick Etten and Catfish Metkovich. There were younger players on the team as well, including rookie second baseman Alfred "Billy" Martin. Rooming with Martin and playing shortstop was Artie Wilson, the first black player on the Oaks since Jimmy Claxton was fired. Wilson won the PCL batting title with a .348 average and also led in stolen bases with 47. In 1950, he led the PCL in runs with 168 and hits with 264, helping the Oaks to the 1950 PCL championship."

Following the season Stengel was hired by the Yankees.

This is one of two that I picked 1948 Oakland Oaks lineup cards I was able to pick up.

Stengel, Casey 1948 pen.jpgStengel, Casey 1948 pen back.jpg
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
Huge new pick-up for me.

While the line-ups I have focused on have had legends as managers, until tonight, none of the games were particularly memorable or important.

Tonight I was able to pick up line-up cards from 2 contemporary managers who are now in the HOF's who were managing against each other.

But the biggest deal here is the game itself. These are the line-up cards from Game 2 of the 1999 World Series between the Yankees and Braves, signed by Torre and Cox respectively.

Often when one has a signed copy of a card from one manager, the other copy will be a carbon copy (because the managers keep one copy for themselves and give one to the umpire and one goes to the other manager) so even having the signed copies from both managers for a game is unusual.

The cards were framed but I made up with the seller to unframe them to save on shipping (I don't have a place to display them anyways, and they will join the other cards I have. Pretty excited about this pickup!

Cox, Bobby WS Game 2.jpg

Torre, 1999 WS Game 2.jpg
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
Really excited to pick up a few new line-up cards. These were found in an old barn in Virginia.

1957 Orioles signed by Paul Richards. Includes Tito Francona as a player and HOF George Kell who hit a homerun in the game
Richards, Paul 1957 Orioles.jpg


Really excited to add 2 more HOF'ers to the collection. That brings my total up to 15 managers who are in the HOF either as players or as managers.

Al Lopez - I had actually not realized that Lopez was a HOF initially as I was not familiar with him. Lopez began his playing career in 1928 with the Brooklyn Robins (he later played for the Boston B's!) and was a defensive minded catcher who set the record for most games played at the position. His playing career ended in 1947 and in 51 he became a manager which he did for 18 years.
Lopez, Al 1957 White Sox - Aparicio, Fox, Doby, Minoso.jpg


Lou Boudreau was a player/manager, mostly for the Indians (back when they figured that a player could at the same time manage.) 8 time All-Star. Won the MVP in 1948 and managed the Indians that same year to a WS win (that team had Satchel Paige on it). Number 5 retired by the Indians and elected to the HOF in 1970.
Boudreau, Lou 1957 Kansas CIty A's.jpg


Also picked up this card. On a couple of these it appears that some kid tried writing the first names of the players. Part of what I like about these is that it I don't have to care/worry much about their condition. It's not about whether a corner is sharp or not. At most it's the overall aesthetics that matter. And in this case a child who obviously did not think this was anything that would be of value, had no problem writing on the lineup card(s). Well, he didn't have the internet to check up all the names and he mistook the "Williams" writing Dick instead of "Ted"
Higgins, Pinky 1957 Red Sox - Ted Williams.jpg
 
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Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
Nice additions as always.

Ryan
Will Clark / Mike Brown Collector
Thanks! I'm really enjoying building this for 2 reason:
1) It provides an interesting angle on some of the great players (who were often not particularly successful managers)
2) It's not something that can be built by simply throwing money at it since these are so hard to find. It involves creative searching and the like.
 

u2me57

Active member
Mar 21, 2014
3,155
Hendersonville, Tn.
Awesome additions! Love the 57's since I'm partial to that year. Question, How do you store or preserve the lineup cards to keep them in good condition and keep them from fading.
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
Awesome additions! Love the 57's since I'm partial to that year. Question, How do you store or preserve the lineup cards to keep them in good condition and keep them from fading.
I love the ones that still used the older style line-up cards, and the 57's fit in with that nicely.

When it comes to condition, it is much less of a concern than cards. Most of them are fairly beaten up as they had utility and weren't intended as collectibles. Fading is slightly more of a concern but I keep them in soft sleeves and toploaders and generally keep them out of the sunlight. (This is really key for signed baseballs; I'm less concerned about 60 year old pen on paper fading, but it can't hurt.) I only display a couple of items at a time. This means they take up less space, and each item when displayed is appreciated and not lost among tons of other items.
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
Awesome additions! Love the 57's since I'm partial to that year. Question, How do you store or preserve the lineup cards to keep them in good condition and keep them from fading.
I love the ones that still used the older style line-up cards, and the 57's fit in with that nicely.

When it comes to condition, it is much less of a concern than cards. Most of them are fairly beaten up as they had utility and weren't intended as collectibles. Fading is slightly more of a concern but I keep them in soft sleeves and toploaders and generally keep them out of the sunlight. (This is really key for signed baseballs; I'm less concerned about 60 year old pen on paper fading, but it can't hurt.) I only display a couple of items at a time. This means they take up less space, and each item when displayed is appreciated and not lost among tons of other items.
 

stof

New member
Oct 9, 2010
14
I have been thinking it would be cool to pick up a White Sox lineup card for awhile now. Your incredible collection has inspired me to follow through with this idea. As you have mentioned, these are relatively scarce but also not widely collected. I'm trying to determine what a fair value would be for lineup card of a historically insignificant game. Any advice?

I'm really enjoying the history you're providing for your most recent pick-ups. It adds flavor in what can often be an uninspiring hobby.
 

Topnotchsy

Featured Contributor, The best players in history?
Aug 7, 2008
9,381
I have been thinking it would be cool to pick up a White Sox lineup card for awhile now. Your incredible collection has inspired me to follow through with this idea. As you have mentioned, these are relatively scarce but also not widely collected. I'm trying to determine what a fair value would be for lineup card of a historically insignificant game. Any advice?

I'm really enjoying the history you're providing for your most recent pick-ups. It adds flavor in what can often be an uninspiring hobby.
Glad you've found them interesting.

When it comes to lineup cards, you have the top copy and the carbon copies. Carbon copies can be found for $10 or less at times. I've posted a link below which fits that.

For the handwritten copy, if the manager is no one significant, nothing significant happened in the game and there are no (or few) big name players, you should be able to one for under $20. If the manager is anyone of note or the game is relevant the price goes up, though outside of the biggest milestones (no-hitter, milestone game etc) people may not realize what they have so you can often find a complete game shutout etc. for no additional cost.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/1976-Texas-...599153?hash=item41c3aa6831:g:8tQAAOSw2xRYcrVq
 

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